Anchorage Insurance Salesperson, Identity Theft Specialist Pleads to Bank Fraud, Identity Theft

Owner of American & Veterans Preferred Life, and Harvard Risk Management of Alaska, Kara Hayden, pleaded guilty to Bank Fraud and Aggravated Identity Theft on Monday. Image-Facebook Profiles

Owner of American & Veterans Preferred Life, and Harvard Risk Management of Alaska, Kara Hayden, pleaded guilty to Bank Fraud and Aggravated Identity Theft on Monday. Image-Facebook Profiles

An Identity Theft Protection Specialist with Harvard Risk Management of Alaska in Anchorage pleaded “Guilty” to charges of Bank Fraud and Aggravated Identity Theft in front of U.S. District Court Judge Sharon L. Gleason, it was announced by the U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday.

51-year-old Kara Hayden of Anchorage, who also worked as an insurance salesperson,  was arrested in late September after she was indicted on two counts of Bank Fraud and Aggravated Identity Theft in an investigation conducted by the U.S. Postal Service and Alaska State Troopers.

According to the investigation and court documents, “From at least October 2014, to December 2015, Hayden applied for seventeen credit cards using the names, social security numbers, and dates of birth of nine different victims without their knowledge or authorization.”


Hayden successfully obtained two credit cards using the identity of three of her former insurance clients with American and Veterans Preferred Life, using them to acquire $14,500 in cash and retail goods before her scheme was uncovered by investigators.

On her online Linkedin profile Hayden said this about her business as a , “I do this because myself and my family now personally knows that Identity Theft is not just about a financial problem.” She went on to state, “Once a criminal has your identity they can commit crimes in your name! Criminals can go to the hospital in your name, change your medical records, take your tax refund, change your IRS records, get a driver’s license in your name and many other things.”

Hayden had also been indicted by an Anchorage Grand Jury in March of 2015 for forgery after she attempted to have her Driver’s License re-instated. She had had her license permanently revoked for multiple DUI convictions. According to the investigation into that incident, Hayden had sent forged documents stating that DUI convictions had been dismissed to the Department of Motor Vehicles. The investigation into the forgery would find incriminating evidence during the execution of a search warrant on her home, where investigators found copies of the forged documents as well as other incriminating evidence on her computer.

At sentencing on March 3rd, 2017, Hayden faces a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine under federal statutes.